Blog

Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo.

Preparing for Hurricane Matthew

Hurricane Matthew is expected to make landfall in Florida soon. While you prepare to evacuate or shelter in place, here are some helpful safety tips from The Weather Channel:

 

If you are advised or ordered to evacuate

·         Follow all directions and orders from local officials, and leave immediately when instructed to do so.

·         Bring emergency supplies, including a first aid kit, medicines, food, water, formula and diapers, toiletries, cell phones, radios, and batteries.

·         Bring extra cash and copies of important papers such as insurance policies.

·         Bring blankets, sleeping bags, books, and games.

·         Unplug appliances, turn off utilities such as electricity and the main water valve.

·         Lock the windows and doors of your home.

 

If you are not told to evacuate

·         Stay at home! Leave the roads available for those who must evacuate.

·         Clean your bathtub with bleach and fill it with water for washing and flushing (not drinking).

·         Set your refrigerator to maximum cold and keep it closed.

·         Turn off your utilities if told to do so by local officials.

 

During the storm

·         Go to an interior room and stay away from windows and doors, even though they're covered.

·         During very strong winds, lie under something sturdy.

·         Do not go outside, including during passage of the eye of the hurricane.

 

  

CRS is tracking and preparing for Hurricane Matthew. Our Catastrophe team is ready to assist both insurance adjusters and policyholders with immediate emergency hotel and housing assistance.

  • We are fully staffed 24/7/365 for immediate assistance.
  • Timely deployment of CRS employees on-site to support adjusters and policyholders.
  • Priority booking with major hotel chains for needs of adjusters and policyholders.
  • Competitive pricing on homes, condos, townhomes, apartments, mobile homes and travel trailers.
  • Capability to provide temporary office trailers for carriers.
  • One point of contact for adjusters and policyholders to minimize confusion.
  • Internal weather tracking so we know where the storm is heading.

 

Some insurance companies are also deploying catastrophe response teams to assist with claim reports in their mobile units and call centers. Among those currently preparing include Allstate, CNA Insurance and GEICO.

 

Current Red Cross Shelter information: https://www.google.org/crisismap/florida_emergency_preparedness

  

Source(s):

 

https://weather.com/safety/hurricane/news/hurricanes-safety-during-20120330

 

http://www.claimsjournal.com/news/southeast/2016/10/06/273989.htm

 

https://www.crsth.com/services/catastrophe/

Read more No Comments

What if a flood happens in my community?

pexels-photo-29095

As we begin to approach the end of summer and continue to see the widespread flooding in Louisiana and growing fires in California, we ask ourselves, “what’s next, and will my community be affected?”.

It is important to know that we are still in the midst of hurricane season, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has recently increased their hurricane estimate from 10 to 16 named storms to 12 to 17. They are now expecting five to eight of those storms to become hurricanes.

Much of the US will feel the impact of these storms. Are you prepared? Does your family have a plan in place in case your home or community are flooded? Do you have flood insurance?

Even if you’re located in a part of the country not commonly impacted by hurricanes, sudden microbursts, severe thunderstorms and melting snow can also lead to flooding. Don’t hesitate to prepare in advance; the best time to put a flood plan in place is when it’s not flooding.

Here’s a few tips on what you can do now to be better prepared for flooding throughout the year:

- Know your flood risk. (www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart/pages/flooding_flood_risks/understanding_your_risk.jsp)

- Make a flood emergency plan. (www.ready.gov/make-a-plan)

- Build or restock your emergency preparedness kit, including a flashlight, batteries, cash, and first aid supplies. (www.ready.gov/kit)

- Consider buying flood insurance.

- Familiarize yourself with local emergency plans. Know where to go and how to get there should you need to get to higher ground, the highest level of a building, or to evacuate.

- Stay tuned to your phone alerts, TV, or radio for weather updates, emergency instructions, or evacuation orders.

How will I know when a potential flood is coming?

The last bullet point above advises us to stay informed by phone, TV and radio for weather updates. It’s necessary to understand the terminology you are hearing:

Flood Watch = “Be Aware.” Conditions are right for flooding to occur in your area.

Flood Warning = “Take Action!”  Flooding is either happening or will happen shortly.

Educating yourself and your family about potential flooding can be one of the most important things you do.

This graphic is called "3 Fast Flood Facts," and features tips on how to stay safe during flooding. The text reads as follows: 3 Fast Flood Facts Heavy rain can bring dangerous flash flooding. 6 inches of moving water can knock a person down. 2 feet of moving water can sweep a vehicle away. Whether you're walking or driving, stay clear of floodwater. Share these facts with friends so they're safe too.

Sources:

www.newyork.cbslocal.com/2016/08/17/hurricane-season-2016

www.ready.gov/floods

www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart/pages/preparation_recovery/before_a_flood.jsp

Read more No Comments